Eastern red bats roost in the leaves of trees and carry their babies everywhere they go: Photo by Chris Harshaw via Wikipedia commons

Eastern red bats roost in the leaves of trees and carry their babies everywhere they go: Photo by Chris Harshaw via Wikipedia commons

Eastern red bats have babies in June. Sometimes they get so tired of carrying them that they fall out of the sky.

Yesterday I spoke with wildlife expert Bonnie Bradshaw regarding a post about venomous snakes (look for that Monday). Before letting her go I asked if there was any other wildlife events we should know about (last time it was zombie raccoons; she always is good for something fascinating).

Indeed there is, she says.

Female eastern red bats, which are common to our neighborhoods as well as most of eastern North America, usually have babies this time of year. They give birth to three to five baby red bats, and because they do not colonize (as do the Mexican free tailed bats, the other type that lives around here) they carry the pups at night as they fly in search of food. The problem, Bradshaw says, is that the mother bats can grow exhausted and dehydrated, and might simply land on the ground, babies and all, when they grow too weary to fly.

“We had two calls in Dallas just last weekend from people who found mothers on the ground with babies clinging to them,” she says.

Bradshaw and the team at 911 Wildlife give the bats water and soon they are flying again. If you happen across a momma bat (or have any other wildlife emergencies or questions) you can reach Bradshaw at 214.368.5911 or visit 911wildlife.com.


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